Thursday Breakout Sessions:

Session I | Session II 

Friday Breakout Sessions:

Session III | Session IV | Session V

Breakout Sessions

Thursday, October 24

Breakout Sessions, Round I: 12:30 - 1:30 p.m.

Nonprofits as Advocates
Track: Advocacy and Public Policy
Activities: Group Discussion
Interested in ways your nonprofit can advocate and promote civic engagement? This session is for you! Minnesota and the world are a better place when nonprofits connect with and educate policy makers to tell the stories of their organizations and communities. In this session, participants will learn how and why to build relationships with elected officials and increase civic engagement with their constituents. Join MCN’s policy experts to learn how advocacy can further your organization’s mission, the rules for nonprofit advocacy, and how to tell the story of your organization within the context of advocacy. And there will be trivia!
Marie Ellis, public policy director and Ileana Mejia, public policy advocate, Minnesota Council of Nonprofits

Attracting Six and Seven Figure Campaign Gifts
Track: Fundraising
Activities: Neighbor Conversations and Small Group Activities
Campaigns to raise funds for new facilities, operations, and endowments are successful because of a compelling case for support and leadership gifts. This workshop will provide insights, strategies, and understanding on how to build a portfolio of lead donor prospects and a compelling case for support.
Tim Torgerson, president and Brighid Hansen, chief executive officer, Hansen Henley Yoder & Lamb

Before Conflict Strikes: Setting Norms for Boards
Track: Leadership and Governance
Activities: Neighbor Conversations, Individual Reflection, and Activity-based Experience
If you’ve ever been on a board, you’re likely familiar with the scenario: one (or two) rabble-rouser(s) are going at it again, derailing the conversation. It’s easy to misplace the challenge here on the current conflict, but the bigger problem that needs to be dealt with is a lack of shared norms. Join Mario and Amanda as they look at how to set up your board for success before conflict arises and to be more comfortable dealing with it when it does!
Amanda Ziebell Mawanda, strategic services consultant and Mario Hernandez, strategic services director, Propel Nonprofits

Building a Realistic Development Plan for Your Organization
Track: Fundraising
Activities: Polls, Neighbor Conversations, and Individual Reflection
Do you have a development plan? And is it realistic? Given what staff is asked to do, how do you find the time to put the plan in action? In this session we will provide a customizable plan that distinguishes what is relevant and a true priority. You will feel energized to approach your workload in a new way. Learn the 5 indispensable components of a development plan, identify your priorities and gaps, and lastly, track your progress and return on investment 28 days later. Leave with tools that will increase your success in fundraising and simultaneously decrease your stress.
Jennifer Scholl, mission advancement and legacy planning officer, Science Museum of Minnesota; Rebecca Haddad, senior gift officer, mission advancement, Science Museum of Minnesota; and Sara Spiess, director of grants and foundation relations, YMCA of the Greater Twin Cities

Integrating Arts into Nonprofit Work: One Nonprofit’s Experience
Track: Evaluation or Programming
Activities: Group Activity
The experience of art can improve self-esteem, encourage self-expression, and strengthen confidence. At Justice and Opportunity for Youth (JOY), art is an integral part of the programming for middle and high school girls who face extraordinary challenges to succeed and thrive. Volunteer leaders and participants from JOY will share how they integrate arts into programming. YOU will have the opportunity to experience a sample of the programming that JOY has introduced including photography, jewelry-making, dance, and drawing.
Julie Ace, president, Justice and Opportunity for Youth (JOY) and Terri Allred, southeast Minnesota regional coordinator, Minnesota Council of Nonprofits

Organizations at Work: Intersectionality, Fit, and Equitable Workplaces
Track: Equity and Community Engagement
Activities: Group Discussion
oHow do you measure diversity? It is important that we create metrics that allow our organizations to measure our successes and be truthful about our challenges. Intersectionality is a tool we can use to examine the complexity of diversity and how our systems respond. In this session, we will examine the notion of fit, intersectionality, and how we can use metrics to create organizations that can sustain diversity, act more inclusively, and serve more equitably.
Andre Koen, trainer, Office of Diversity and Inclusion, Mayo Clinic

Pay Decisions: The Good, the Bad, and the Costly
Track: Finance, Operations, and HR
Activities: Polls and Pitch Tank
When employers review their salary adjustment budgets, the tendency may be to increase everyone equally and avoid the opportunity to differentiate the amounts good performing employees receive. We think there is a better way. Join this session to explore answers to these questions as they apply to your organization: Is it O.K. to withhold salary increases from employees who are paid well for their job responsibilities? If so, what’s the best way to communicate this? What about pay decreases? How can one determine how much an individual employee should be paid? What is the best way to determine the going market rate for a job and how does that enter into pay decisions? Should base pay be linked to performance? If so, how? What about cost-of-living and other inflation factors? What if there are very limited financial resources for increases? How can an organization adopt a living wage strategy?
Robert Lemke, principal, HR and Compensation Consulting Practice, Gallagher

Prepare for Takeoff: Building your Leadership Resilience Capability
Track: Finance, Operations, and HR
Activities: Neighbor Conversations, Individual Reflection, and Group Activity
Do you ever feel like you just can’t breathe? As though the pressure of trying to meet the expectations of everyone around you is sometimes too much? If so, this session is for you. Discover the importance of putting your oxygen mask on before helping others. Research shows resilience is critical to performance at the individual, team, and organizational level. In fact, 70 percent of workplace change programs are unsuccessful, often because organizations fail to appropriately equip their leaders and therefore can’t sustain the work. In this workshop, you will explore your reaction to change, how it may be impacting results, and why you must compose yourself before attempting to lead others. You’ll learn to diagnose your team members’ reactions and acquire strategies for engaging each of them effectively. You will also have the opportunity to try different resilience building techniques and will leave with your own leadership resilience toolkit.
Kate Rykhus, consultant/coach, CoCreated Consulting LLC and JoAnn Hawkins, director of operations & human resources, Women's Advocates

Stakeholder Marketing for Nonprofits
Track: Marketing and Communications
Activities: Individual Reflection and Small Group Activities
“Stakeholder: a person or group that has an interest in an organization.” Now, how do you move past the buzzword to identify and engage your nonprofit's stakeholders? How do you apply marketing principles when the marketing exchange is hard to discern and measure? Jason will show you how to connect with your stakeholders by adapting proven marketing methods to your unique nonprofit community. No fluff, no hype, just real relationship building. Nonprofit professionals from entry level to senior leadership will benefit from this examination of stakeholder marketing. You will come away with a fresh perspective and new tools to serve the people who matter to your nonprofit. From a family desperately needing your services tonight to a major foundation ready to award a six-figure grant, convince all your stakeholders how much you matter to them.
Jason Karpf, college instructor and donor relations director, The Salvation Army Northern Division

Breakout Sessions and City Tours, Round II: 3:45 - 5 p.m.

Another World Is Possible: Revolutionizing Fundraising and Grantmaking
Track: Fundraising
Activities: Group Discussion
The Giving Project is an innovative model that funds social change, builds community, and develops leaders. Over the last five years, nearly 100 participants in Headwaters Foundation for Justice’s Giving Project have collectively given and raised over $650,000 to support community organizing led by and for people of color in Minnesota. In this workshop, you’ll hear from past participants about their experience of raising money through relational, one-to-one fundraising. You’ll learn about the participatory grantmaking process that places racial justice, democratic decision-making, and community voice at the center of the work. You’ll leave with new ideas and inspiration to build community across difference and move resources in ways that reflect the world we want to see.
Allison Johnson Heist, senior program officer, Headwaters Foundation for Justice; Jonathan C. W. Jones, founder, Ideation4 and alumni, Headwaters Giving Project; Samantha Sencer-Mura, executive director, Mid-Continent Oceanographic Institute; and AsaleSol Young, director of marketing and development, Urban Homeworks

Cutting Edge Strategies for Engaging Volunteers to Meet Mission
Track: Equity and Community Engagement
Activities: Neighbor Conversations, Individual Reflection, and Small Group Activities
In the "new normal" of high demand for service and tight funding, nonprofits must turn to volunteers in fresh and creative ways to meet mission. The Minnesota Association for Volunteer Administration has been developing strategies to do just that. Learn what we have found in researching trends, surveying our members across the state, and leading focus groups with nonprofits that deliver the majority of their services with volunteers. During this workshop you will learn to chart a new direction for your nonprofit with nine cutting edge strategies to help you maximize the impact of volunteers. Explore how to design volunteer positions for today’s volunteers, streamline your volunteer program process, and get organizational buy-in for a culture that focuses on impact through volunteers. Assess your organization’s readiness to fully engage volunteers and move your organization to a next level of volunteer engagement.
Karmit Bulman, executive director and Jenna Egan, membership & development manager, Minnesota Association for Volunteer Administration (MAVA)

Destination Medical Center Walking Tour
Track: Leadership and Governance
Activities: Walking Tour. This workshop will start and end in front of the MCN registration table (2nd floor). The group will depart promptly at 3:45 and will return by 5:15 p.m.
What does it take to transform an urban environment? With Mayo Clinic at its heart, Destination Medical Center (DMC) is the largest public-private economic initiative in Minnesota and the catalyst for growth in Rochester. DMC representative, Jamie Rothe, will lead a walking tour of its two primary initiatives: Heart of the City and One Discovery Square. Discovery Square is a 16 block sub-district built in a highly connected urban life science hub. It merges innovation and collaboration to create a healthy ecosystem for private/public partnerships. Heart of the City encompasses the core of downtown Rochester and is designed to elevate both the patient experience and the vitality of Rochester. Heart of the City enhances public spaces to create engaging experiences for residents and visitors. Multiple projects including the renovation of the Historic Chateau Theater will be developed in conjunction with this initiative. At each stop along the way we’ll focus on the impact of change and the collaborative efforts it takes to transform a city.

Don’t Die on Your Way Home: The Importance of Legacy and Transitional Planning
Track: Finance, Operations, and HR
Activities: Individual Reflection and List Creation Activity
No one lives forever. You won’t hold your job forever, either, and that’s not necessarily a bad thing. Change is inevitable and it’s critical for nonprofits and their teams to plan for it – both emergencies and planned departures. Transitional planning or legacy planning is not just a matter of making sure your files are backed up. How you organize and plan for the future can serve or sever a mission. Transitional planning not only leaves a legacy to those that follow in your footsteps, but it can also make your current work more organized and rewarding. Join a witty and informative session on the positives and perils of legacy planning. You’ll leave this session with statistics on the cost of turnover, the dramatic effects of poor transitional planning, and the rewards of planning well. You’ll also leave with next steps to properly equip your organization and staff for change.
Jamie Schumacher, executive director, West Bank Business Association

Implicit Bias: The Big Trust Buster
Track: Leadership and Governance
Activities: Neighbor Conversations, Group Discussion, and Small Group Activities
Our brain takes in 11 million bits of information per second, but is only able to process 40 bits. The information we filter affects how and why we make the decisions we do. Learn more about the impact implicit bias has on our decision-making and how we can actively shift our behavior, attitudes, and actions to ensure that we are engaging with others from a place of greater awareness.
Regina Seabrook, program manager for professional development; Paula O'Loughlin, program manager for classroom partnerships and professional learning; and Sebastian Witherspoon, executive director, Equity Alliance MN

Mobilizing for the 2020 Census: A Menu of Action Options
Track: Advocacy and Public Policy
Activities: Group Discussion
Nonprofits have a critical role in the 2020 census. Now is the time to mobilize! This session presents an opportunity for nonprofit leaders to learn about the landscape of the 2020 census, different action steps nonprofits can take, and why it’s important to achieve a complete count of all Minnesotans. A menu of action items and a template for action planning will be provided for nonprofit leaders to bring back to their organizations. All of us depend on a fair and accurate count. Come and learn how you can join the census 2020 education and mobilization efforts happening all across the state.
Michelle Chang, policy and equity coordinator, Minnesota Council of Nonprofits

Policies & Practices for Nonprofit Success
Track: Finance, Operations, and HR
Activities: Polls, Neighbor Conversations, and Group Discussion
Join this session for a dive deep into nonprofit policies and practices that can position your organization for success. During this session we will explore and expand upon the six policies required by Charities Review Council, including what exactly is required in order to Meet Standards®. We’ll also talk about three bonus practices that your organization can adopt for long-term success. Whether you’re new to creating organizational policies and practices, or just interested in gaining practical advice on promising practices, this session is for you!
Kris Kewitsch, executive director, Charities Review Council; and Kelly Rietow, principal, Roo Solutions

Understanding the Threats from Organized Hate
Track: Equity and Community Engagement
Activities: Group Discussion
Join this workshop to understand the threats from organized hate in Minnesota and the impact on the nonprofit sector. With the documented rise in hate crimes nationally, nonprofits have the ability to create safe spaces for people to learn. Join this session to get concrete ideas about what you and your organization can do to stop this rise in hate.
Jaylani Hussein, executive director, CAIR-Minnesota

Walking Art Tour of Downtown Rochester
Track: Evaluation or Programming
Activities: Walking Tour. This workshop will start and end in front of the MCN registration table (2nd floor). The group will depart promptly at 3:45 and will return by 5:15 p.m.
Artists and nonprofits in Rochester have worked together to create a thriving arts ecosystem in the downtown area. Join us for a walking tour of three organizations who are making an impact. The Rochester Arts Center offers the opportunity for all people to understand and value the arts through innovative experiences with contemporary art. Its beautiful views of the river make it a favorite location for art related community events and exhibits. The Rochester Civic Theatre (RCT) educates and enriches the people of southeast Minnesota through the production and presentation of live theater, music, and dance. With the recent launch of the Black Box Theater, RCT offers an innovative venue for presenting art to the community. The Castle Community has created a unique and rejuvenated community gathering space where artists can afford to work, learn, and grow in their craft. Managed by the nonprofit, Threshold Arts, the organization offers studio space for artists, a bookstore, coffee shop, restaurant, maker’s space, and large performing arts venue.

When Systems Stagnate: The Minnesota-Nice Paradox
Track: Leadership and Governance
Activities: Polls, Neighbor Conversations, and Decision-making Activity
Join us to examine how Minnesotan culture impacts our daily interactions with one another and our nonprofits’ decision-making. We’ll unpack how unwritten rules and governance patterns exclude those most able to generate positive change while weaving in personal stories and illustrations from complexity science. Participants will leave with an understanding of their nonprofit’s decision-making patterns, how and whom they exclude, and practical interventions to dial-up the energy and inclusive spirit of their organization—to leverage what’s great about “Minnesota Nice,” while letting go of what’s not.
Brigid Riley, principal, B. E. Riley Consulting; Kia Moua, principal, Kia Moua Consulting; and Sherry Johnson, principal, Cultivate Strategy LLC

Friday, October 25

Breakout Sessions, Round III: 8 - 9 a.m.

21st Century Staffing: Finding and Keeping the BEST Employees
Track: Equity and Community Engagement
Activities: Group Discussion
Meet the challenges presented by a changing workforce in this practical exploration of inclusion and equity for nonprofits. The workshop provides tools and tactics for fine-tuning your culture to attract and retain qualified personnel. We will focus on the various facets of human culture and how they present and are interpreted in the workplace and during client interactions. Diversity is a state. Inclusion is an action. Equity is an outcome.
Jyoti Grewal, senior facilitator and Dee Sabol, executive director, The Diversity Council

Advocating for Your Nonprofit’s Mission: Advanced Discussion
Track: Advocacy and Public Policy
Activities: Group Discussion
Join this session to dig-into complex types of nonprofit advocacy work including coalition building, grassroots organizing, and voter mobilization. Whether focused on local, statewide, or national issues – nonprofit advocacy work is an important strategy for advancing your mission.
Molly Moilanen, director of public affairs, ClearWay Minnesota

Beyond Geographic Difference: Rural Excellence in Action
Track: Equity and Community Engagement
Activities: Individual Reflection, Small Group Activities, and Network Mapping
Rural nonprofits have long been measured in comparison to organizations with access to financial, cultural, and network privilege. Look beyond the perceived deficiencies, and you find a rich culture of coalition building, resourcefulness, and collaboration. Join nonprofit, foundation, and capacity building leaders from Greater Minnesota for a peek inside their work addressing childcare shortages, aging populations, and economic development in rural communities. Hear from leaders from Community Connections Allies, an organization developed to address childcare needs and senior dining in Bruno, as part of a unique private/nonprofit partnership. Additionally, Northwest Minnesota Foundation will share their ongoing partnerships with communities in Halstad and Warroad to build cross-sector partnerships. Charities Review Council will lead a capacity building activity to help you bring the conversation back to your organization to improve coalition building, partnerships, and impact, regardless of your geographic location.
DeeDee LeMier, engagement & outreach manager, Charities Review Council; Nate Dorr, vice president for advocacy, Northwest Minnesota Foundation; and Shellie Metzler, executive director, Community Connections Allies

Effective Grant Applications: A Conversation with Funders
Track: Fundraising
Activities: Group Discussion and Small Group Activities
Grant opportunities have been shrinking, making applying for grants more competitive than ever. This is especially challenging for smaller nonprofits where staff wear many hats and grant writing is only a small portion of the work. If your grant proposal was rejected when you thought your program was a match with the funding criteria, this session is for you. Grantmakers Mary’s Pence and (TBD) will describe their review and award process, highlighting common reasons that applications are considered for funding or passed over. During this session, you will learn tips and steps you can take to create grant proposals that catch the attention of grantmakers. You will learn how grantmakers vet potential grantee organizations and what they look for when evaluating a potential partnership. Through hands-on learning, you will work through review exercises using real examples of grant applications and budgets that put you in the role of reviewer.
Robyn Browning, grants manager, Mary’s Pence; Jessica Mathias, executive director, Open Your Heart to the Hungry and Homeless; and Katherine Wojtan, executive director, Mary’s Pence

Elevating Your Interviews to Hire the Best
Track: Finance, Operations, and HR
Activities: Polls, Individual Reflection, and Small Group Activities
Despite today’s job market, where it’s so difficult to find qualified candidates, we still cannot afford to make a wrong hire. This could be more costly to your nonprofit than leaving a position vacant. In this session, we’ll explore how you can connect with candidates at a deeper level to break through the interview “facade” and learn more about each candidate. The result: you hire the right person, with the right fit, and the right potential to benefit your organization.
Arlene Vernon, president, HRx, Inc.

Google Ads, Grants, and the Importance of “Conversion”
Track: Marketing and Communications
Activities: Group Discussion
Google Grants provides up to $10,000 each month for nonprofit organizations to spend advertising in Google search. Most nonprofits don’t use the free grant, or don’t know that “conversions goals” are required to really get the attention of new potential supporters. This session will review pre- and post- Google Ads data for a smaller charity, and show how a measured goal (donation made, newsletter sign-up, advocacy action taken) can impact the overall ads program for reaching new audiences. This session will focus more on the process of selecting ad campaign words (using tools such as Google Keyword Planner), looking out for the “quality penalty” imposed by Google for ads which don’t generate clicks, and higher per-click eligibility rewards for meeting quality measures.
Steve Boland, managing partner, Next in Nonprofits

Mindful Leadership: Cultivating an Environment of Present Moment Awareness
Track: Leadership and Governance
Activities: Individual Reflection, Small Group Activities, and Formal Meditation Practice
Emotional intelligence has long been seen as one of the single biggest predictors of performance in the workplace and a strong driver of leadership and personal excellence. A more recent emerging trend in leadership is the use of mindfulness practices to increase effective leadership skills. Join us for an experiential and highly participatory session, which specifically shows how mindfulness practice has a direct influence on increasing one’s EQ. Marcie and Sonja will first lay out the contextual framework whereby participants can begin to understand the relationship between mindfulness practice and their ability to lead themselves and others more effectively within a stressful environment. We specifically address stress reactivity and the learned ability to respond, the effects of perception, appraisal, and attitude on patterns of intra- and interpersonal communication. Attendees will participate in formal meditation practices with group facilitated inquiry into individual experiences of the practice.
Sonja Kuhn, owner, Journey Coaching and Training and Marcie Wagner, founder and director, Laughing Buddha Meditation Centre and Wagner Fundraising

Nonprofits Creating Social Entrepreneurships: Lessons Learned
Track: Finance, Operations, and HR
Activities: Group Discussion
How are nonprofits creatively integrating social enterprises into their missions? What are the benefits and challenges of doing so? Join a group of nonprofit entrepreneurs to discuss how their nonprofits incorporated social enterprises to generate income, diversify funding sources, and create opportunities for job training for their clients. They will share their lessons learned so that you can evaluate whether adding a social enterprise to your nonprofit makes sense for you.
Terri Allred, southeast Minnesota regional coordinator, Minnesota Council of Nonprofits; Melanie Brennan, founder and CEO, Exercisabilities; and Chad Campbell, CEO, Boys and Girls Club of Rochester

Reinvigorate Your Evaluation: 15+ Free or Low-cost Tools
Track: Evaluation or Programming
Activities: Group Activity
Does your organization’s evaluation need a boost? Could you use some inspiration for how to better present and share evaluation results? In a quick-fire presentation, the evaluation nerds at Wilder Research will share our favorite resources to help you demystify evaluation, make sense of your data, and present useful results. We’ll also include time for you to share your favorite evaluation resources with the group. You will leave with a list of new (and free or low-cost) resources to enhance your organization’s evaluation efforts. Whether you are new to evaluation or a seasoned evaluator, come and reinvigorate your evaluation practice!
Jackie Aman, research scientist and Kerry Walsh, communication specialist, Amherst H. Wilder Foundation

Breakout Sessions, Round IV: Peer Action Conversations: 11 a.m. - 12 p.m.

During this round of sessions, conference participants will engage in a facilitated peer-to-peer conversation of a topic of your choosing. Facilitators will guide the groups of peers to engage in conversation - starting with inquiry / reflection and ending with interpretation / action planning. Registered attendees will help select topics of conversation by voting throughout the summer months. A link to the survey will be emailed to registrants. Watch your inbox for further details.

The full list of conversation topics will be posted online in early-September.

Breakout Sessions, Round V: 2 - 3 p.m.

Big Ideas, Big Campaign, Big Transformation
Track: Fundraising
Activities: Individual Reflection and Small Group Activities
Fundraising campaigns aren’t really about money – they are about the big ideas that inspire donors and transform organizations internally and externally. This session presents a case study for a $10 million program expansion campaign for Project Success, and how this campaign was the catalyst for the organization to attract new 7-figure donors, significantly expand its board and staff, and create a national platform for thought leadership and impact. Learn how this nonprofit strategically built a major fundraising initiative to be the catalyst to implement strategic plan initiatives and propel the organization to a new level.
Adrienne Diercks, founder and executive director, Project Success and Joan Grathwol Olson, vice president, Creative Fundraising Advisors

Diving in to the Nuances of Specific Populations
Track: Evaluation or Programming
Activities: Group Discussion and Small Group Activities
When nonprofits are planning and evaluating new programs, services, or strategies, they often need information about the communities in which they work. However, public data sources (e.g., census data) often lack the nuance needed to understand specific populations or issues. And, when gathering new data, new questions might emerge, and you may realize there is more diversity in community that requires deeper exploration. The data-seeking-data approach is a non-linear, iterative process for gathering the information you need and allowing for follow-up on insights as they are uncovered. For example, start with existing population and program data, determine what new questions emerge, and build relationships in communities to answer those new questions. This panel will draw on recent projects to share the challenges they were trying to overcome, why it was important to them, and how they balanced their need for a clear process with making room for discovery.
Courtney Clingan, senior consultant, The Improve Group and Cassidy Titcomb, senior director, strategic initiatives, Community Action Partnership of Ramsey & Washington Counties

Enacting Change From Every Spot on the Org Chart
Track: Leadership and Governance
Activities: Polls and Small Group Activities
You’ve studied the books, drawn on your own experience, and gone to the conferences. You know what your organization needs to change. But how do you create that change – especially if you aren’t the one making the big decisions? In this fun and interactive session, we will move past the jargon to share surprising ways you can build consensus and enact change at your organization, regardless of your position on the org chart. You will come away with straightforward tools and hands-on techniques you can use to make the case for change to your colleagues, executive, and board leadership. We’ll talk about what to do when you face push back around needed change, and help you navigate the tough conversations and conflicts that may arise. You will leave this session with renewed confidence in your ability to enact meaningful change at your organization.
Stephanie Brown, principal, Yellow House Ideas; Julie Strand, arts program director, COMPAS; and Jules Wilkins, director of external relations, COMPAS and principal, JulesWrites

Express Yourself! Wait, Not Like That
Track: Equity and Community Engagement
Activities: Neighbor Conversations, Group Discussion, and Individual Reflection
We say we want our team members and our constituents to bring their whole selves but are we prepared to suspend judgement when someone’s whole self doesn’t act just like us? In this session you will learn the Intercultural Conflict Styles model to shed light on how our innate and learned preferences for direct or indirect communication and expressive or restrained emotional expression impact diversity, inclusion, and equity goals. Through individual, pair, and small group activities you’ll investigate your implicit biases and how to differentiate between disrespect and emotional expression, evasiveness and saving face. You will walk away with new insights and a specific goal for yourself as a leader, a team member, and a community liaison.
Pearl Dobbins, director of equity and human development, Washburn Center for Children and Joayne Larson, intercultural competence and leadership coach, Sparks of Change

Help! My Fundraising Event Isn't Working
Track: Fundraising
Activities: Polls, Individual Reflection, and Small Group Activities
Fundraising events are an important source of revenue for most organizations to bring in crucial dollars for their mission. Sometimes, longstanding events can either lose their luster or stagnate in their dollars raised year over year, frustrating development staff and board members alike. Join us to explore options for evaluating the status of your organization's event as well as looking at the possibility of launching a new event if your organization is ready for a fresh start. From evaluation to ideation, learn how metrics, surveys, and key stakeholders at your organization can help push the limits of what is possible with events. You'll walk away with new donor stewardship ideas, concrete data, and complimentary resources to aid you in future fundraising events.
Max Erickson, events & stewardship coordinator, Park Nicollet Foundation and Jennifer Halcrow, president, Corvus North

The Emotional Bind of Compassionate Care
Track: Equity and Community Engagement
Activities: Group Discussion
Compassion fatigue can strike the most caring and dedicated helping professionals. Compassion fatigue can affect both their personal and professional lives with symptoms such as difficulty concentrating, intrusive imagery, loss of hope, exhaustion, and irritability. It can also lead to profound shifts in the way helpers view the world and their loved ones. In this session, you will learn the signs of compassion fatigue, strategies to prevent it, and suggestions for intervention if you are experiencing it.
Daniel Hilliker, chair, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry & Psychology, Mayo Clinic

The Twelve Golden Rules of Nonprofit Finance
Track: Finance, Operations, and HR
Activities: Polls and Neighbor Conversations
Nonprofit financial health can seem like an elusive, nuanced, and subjective judgment call. But when you break it down, it boils down to 12 Golden Rules of Nonprofit Finance that help keep your organization healthy. From budgeting to operating reserves, if you follow these rules, you’ll be on your way to a better understanding of nonprofit financial health. This session is a great introduction for those who are new to nonprofit finance.
Sarah Jackson, loan officer and financial specialist, Propel Nonprofits

Transparency in Crisis – and Non-crisis – Communications
Track: Marketing and Communications
Activities: Group Discussion
No organization relishes talking about challenges, but not talking about them can certainly lead to even worse results. Transparency will often prompt improved support if it is voluntary (and not coming after an ill-timed report in the local news). This case study will follow the decisions of In the Heart of The Beast Puppet and Mask Theater as it went public with a challenging set of information about their annual May Day Festival and Parade. This tiered-communications approach had to dismiss some fears, and took an investment in staff and board time to show a potential path forward without over-promising. The transparency theme need not be limited to just difficult news. A commitment to using transparency tools such as the Charities Review Council and Candid (formerly Guidestar) can create a framework for how “boring” data can increase donor engagement – even if the donor doesn’t actually read it.
Steve Boland, managing partner, Next in Nonprofits